Beyonder Court

Catching Some ZZZZZZZ's
Home
Should Children Gather at the Deathbed? What to Do For Kids When the Family is Grieving
A Word on thne Tragedy in Connecticut
Discipline For Small Children
Children are dogs, Teenagers are Cats.
Developmental Milestones
BACK TO REASON
ARCHIVED ARTICLES
A KIDS WORLD--LINGO, TRENDS, CULTURE
BEYONDER INSPIRATIONS
CARING FOR THE CAREGIVER
TRAVELING WITH KIDS---TO BEYOND AND BACK!
Practical tips on living with kids
AT HOME WITH THE BEYONDER QUEEN
meal ideas
games and trivia
sign the guest book, TAKE THE POLL
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF COMMON PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTURBANCES

The clock ticks. Its red light stabs your eyes again. It's ten minutes later than it was the last time you looked at it.
 
YOU NEED SLEEP!
 
But your mind replays everything that happened during your day.
It imagines everything that MIGHT happen tomorrow
And it won't quit playing the theme song from The High and the Mighty, which was a really cool movie but which doesn't belong in your would-be dreams all night long.
How do you get to sleep?
 
Well, let's start before you go to bed.
 
1) Keep your bedroom ONLY for sleeping. There are some obvious exceptions to this, even for Beyonders, but you get the idea. No model-making, card-playing. TV watching, Playstation Challenges.
 
2)Try to keep a regular bed time. Okay, I understand DSS called last night at 11:45 telling you they would be right over with twin girls. That's a good reason to stay up. Watching the last hour of The Inn of the Sixth Happiness ( which starred Ingrid Bergman and which was a great movie--maybe my favorite of all times) is not.
 
3) No bed time snacks  Why? Your blood sugar will peak then fall and the sudden fluctuation may wake you after you fall asleep. AND if it's popcorn, you may be tempted to watch the rest of the movie. BUT you might try eating about three hours befor retiring--keep it light.
 
4) Keep your bedroom cool--no warmer than 70 degrees.
 
5) In cooler weather, wear socks to bed. Your feet have a lot of blood vessels in them, close to the surface. They get cold faster than other parts of your body and will wake you demanding the covers.
 
6) Nothing to drink from two hours before bed time. This one is a no-brainer. Okay, you might get up to go to the bathroom and fall over the ottoman breaking your toe. making it necessary to take some Ibuprofen with a glass of water which will attack you exactly one-half hour after you return to bed. 
 
7) Keep your bedroom dark. This is important to cue the body's sleep rhythms. And, the vision of some Beyonders in their Beyonderwear might be enough to cause nightmares.
 
8) No exercise an hour before retiring --Although a regular exercise program will help you maintain a healthy emotional outlook. Do it earlier in the day.
 
And if you get to bed and just lie there, tossing and turning and making your husband so grumpy he tells you to lie still or go down and sleep on the couch but you've been battling bursitis in your arm and you really can't sleep on the couch so you try to lie still but then the blanket tangles and you jerk at it and hit your husband in the nose so that it bleeds and HE goes downstairs to sleep on the couch. ( Not that this has ever happened to me)
 
GET UP
 
Drink a little HOT MILK ( yes, it really does help)
 
READ A BORING BOOK
 
PLAY A QUIET GAME  (Not your son's Star Wars Nintendo)
 
STAY OFF THE INTERNET  's too easy to get caught up in content and spend hours there
 

FOODS THAT HELP YOU SLEEP

What you eat affects how you sleep. One of the keys to a restful night's sleep is to get your brain calmed rather than revved up. Some foods contribute to restful sleep; other foods keep you awake. We call them sleepers and wakers. Sleepers are tryptophan-containing foods, because tryptophan is the amino acid that the body uses to make serotonin, the neurotransmitter that slows down nerve traffic so your brain isn't so busy. Wakers are foods that stimulate neurochemicals that perk up the brain

According to the Mayo Clinic, the best bed-time snacks ( again not right before bed) are:


 

FOODS THAT HELP YOU SLEEP

What you eat affects how you sleep. One of the keys to a restful night's sleep is to get your brain calmed rather than revved up. Some foods contribute to restful sleep; other foods keep you awake. We call them sleepers and wakers. Sleepers are tryptophan-containing foods, because tryptophan is the amino acid that the body uses to make serotonin, the neurotransmitter that slows down nerve traffic so your brain isn't so busy. Wakers are foods that stimulate neurochemicals that perk up the brain.

Tryptophan is a precursor of the sleep-inducing substances serotonin and melatonin. This means tryptophan is the raw material that the brain uses to build these relaxing neurotransmitters. Making more tryptophan available, either by eating foods that contain this substance or by seeing to it that more tryptophan gets to the brain, will help to make you sleepy. On the other hand, nutrients that make tryptophan less available can disturb sleep.

Eating carbohydrates with tryptophan-containing foods makes this calming amino acid more available to the brain. A high carbohydrate meal stimulates the release of insulin, which helps clear from the bloodstream those amino acids that compete with tryptophan, allowing more of this natural sleep-inducing amino acid to enter the brain and manufacture sleep- inducing substances, such as serotonin and melatonin. Eating a high-protein meal without accompanying carbohydrates may keep you awake, since protein-rich foods also contain the amino acid, tyrosine, which perks up the brain.

To understand how tryptophan and carbohydrates work together to relax you, picture the various amino acids from protein foods as passengers on a bus. A busload containing tryptophan and tyrosine arrives at the brain cells. If more tyrosine "passengers" get off the bus and enter the brain cells, neuroactivity will rev up. If more tryptophan amino acids get off the bus, the brain will calm down. Along comes some insulin which has been stalking carbohydrates in the bloodstream. Insulin keeps the tyrosine amino acids on the bus, allowing the brain-calming tryptophan effect to be higher than the effect of the brain-revving tyrosine.

You can take advantage of this biochemical quirk by choosing protein or carbohydrate-rich meals, depending on whether you want to perk up or slow down your brain. For students and working adults, high protein, medium-carbohydrate meals are best eaten for breakfast and lunch. For dinner and bedtime snacks, eat a meal or snack that is high in complex carbohydrates, with a small amount of protein that contains just enough tryptophan to relax the brain. An all- carbohydrate snack, especially one high in junk sugars, is less likely to help you sleep. You'll miss out on the sleep-inducing effects of tryptophan, and you may set off the roller-coaster effect of plummeting blood sugar followed by the release of stress hormones that will keep you awake. The best bedtime snack is one that has both complex carbohydrates and protein, and perhaps some calcium. Calcium helps the brain use the tryptophan to manufacture melatonin. This explains why dairy products, which contain both tryptophan and calcium, are one of the top sleep-inducing foods.

SNOOZE FOODS

These are foods high in the sleep-inducing amino acid tryptophan:

  • Dairy products: cottage cheese, cheese, milk
  • Soy products: soy milk, tofu, soybean nuts
  • Seafood
  • Meats
  • Poultry
  • Whole grains
  • Beans
  • Rice
  • Hummus
  • Lentils
  • Hazelnuts, Peanuts
  • Eggs
  • Sesame seeds, sunflower seeds

    BEST BEDTIME SNACKS

    Foods that are high in carbohydrates and calcium, and medium-to-low in protein also make ideal sleep-inducing bedtime snacks. Some examples:

  • apple pie and ice cream (my favorite)
  • whole-grain cereal with milk
  • hazelnuts and tofu
  • oatmeal and raisin cookies, and a glass of milk
  • peanut butter sandwich, ground sesame seeds (It takes around one hour for the tryptophan in the foods to reach the brain, so don't wait until right before bedtime to have your snack.)

    Lighter meals are more likely to give you a restful night's sleep. High-fat meals and large servings prolong the work your digestive system needs to do, and all the gas production and rumblings may keep you awake. Some people find that highly-seasoned foods (e.g., hot peppers and garlic) interfere with sleep, especially if you suffer from heartburn.  Going to bed with a full stomach does not, for most people, promote a restful night's sleep. While you may fall asleep faster, all the intestinal work required to digest a big meal is likely to cause frequent waking and a poorer quality of sleep. Eat your evening meal early.

    Heed the sleep wisdom: "Don't dine after nine."

    (from the website Ask Dr. Sears)

     

    And remember to stay away from caffeine. No coffee, colas, Mountain Dew. etc. Even some headache meds have a lot of caffeine. read the labels!

  •